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16:9 / Widescreen Format

If you're presenting on a widescreen display (16:9), it's likely that you will have black bars on the left and right, framing your slides.  

4by3.png  photo.jpg

This is because the iPad (where our app began) has fullscreen dimensions (4:3), and Haiku Deck currently generates decks with slides featuring those dimensions.

The only current work-around would be to export your deck to PowerPoint or Keynote and adjust the slide sizes there. This will distort your slide content, so it's not a preferable solution in most cases, as it will make your text and photos look stretched out.

If you'd still like to try this, here's how you can do it in Keynote:

If your Keynote icon looks like this:

scroll down and review the steps for Keynote 6.0 or higher. Otherwise:

1. Save your deck to the web, then from the deck's Share menu (square icon with an arrow pointing straight up), choose PowerPoint / Keynote.

2. If you're using the iPad app, then the Mail app will open for you to send the exported file as an attachment via email. Send it to an email address you can access on the computer you have Keynote on.  (If the deck is too large to email, you may have to retrieve it from your iPad via iTunes with the steps here.) If you're using the Web App, the file will download to wherever your browser saves downloads by default.

3. Open the file in Keynote.

4. Open the Inspector from the blue button in the top right corner of the window.

Screen_Shot_2013-06-14_at_10.30.58_AM.png

5. In the inspector, here are several buttons across the top of your inspector for making different types of adjustments to your slides. Choose the Metrics inspector with the small ruler button near the center.

Screen_Shot_2013-06-14_at_10.34.56_AM.png

6. Single-click the image on your slide to select it.

7. Un-check the Constrain Proportions box in the Metrics Inspector window. This step tells Keynote that later, when you resize your slide's dimensions, the image can resize along with it. It prevents you from having to manually resize each image later.

8. Repeat steps 6 & 7 for each slide in your deck.  

9. Switch to the Document Inspector by clicking the leftmost button in the Inspector, with a Keynote icon.

Screen_Shot_2013-06-14_at_10.39.22_AM.png 

10. In the Slide Size drop-down at the bottom, you can choose a widescreen size, such as 1920 x 1080. This will convert your entire deck to that format.

Steps for Keynote 6.0 or higher:

 

1. Save your deck to the web, then from the deck's Share menu (square icon with an arrow pointing straight up), choose PowerPoint / Keynote.

2. If you're using the iPad app, then the Mail app will open for you to send the exported file as an attachment via email. Send it to an email address you can access on the computer you have Keynote on.  (If the deck is too large to email, you may have to retrieve it from your iPad via iTunes with the steps here.) If you're using the Web App, the file will download to wherever your browser saves downloads by default.

3. Open the file in Keynote.

4. Click the Format button (paintbrush icon) in the upper right corner of the window.

5. Choose the Arrange tab below the Format/Animate/Document buttons.

6. Single-click the image on your slide to select it.

7. Un-check the Constrain Proportions box in the format tools on the right. This step tells Keynote that later, when you resize your slide's dimensions, the image can resize along with it. It prevents you from having to manually resize each image later.

8. Repeat steps 6 & 7 for each slide in your deck.  

9. Click the Document button in the top right.

10. Make sure the Document tab is selected, then look for the Slide Size drop-down menu. From there, you can change your presentation size to 16:9.

Here's are some examples of how the text and images will be distorted:

 

About_Mom.001.jpg     versus     About_Mom_wide.001.jpg

 

About_Mom.004.jpg     versus     About_Mom_wide.004.jpg

 

The crispness of the edges of your text may be compromised as well:

 

Screen_Shot_2013-06-14_at_10.51.14_AM.png     versus     Screen_Shot_2013-06-14_at_10.50.56_AM.png

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